QB64 Report

Interview with Loudar, from Germany

November 29, 2021 Fellippe Heitor Season 3 Episode 4
QB64 Report
Interview with Loudar, from Germany
Show Notes Transcript

In today's episode, we're going to listen from Loudar, from Germany. How he started programming, and how he became a member of the QB64 community.

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Fellippe:

Welcome to another episode of QB64. Report, your podcast on QB64 and all things nerdy. I'm your host Fellippe Heitor. And in today's episode, we're going to listen from Loudar, from Germany. How he started programming, and how he became a member of the QB64 community. Let's get to it. Hi, Loudar.

Loudar:

Hey,

Fellippe:

Welcome aboard. Thank you for joining us.

Loudar:

Of course. It's a pleasure.

Fellippe:

So I'm asking basically the same questions to people in this series of short interviews, which aims to get to know the community a little better. We know names, we know projects, but we don't know the basic history. And of course we're not going to get into anything up close and personal. But the idea is to get to know essentially things like when did you start programming?

Loudar:

I personally started when I was 11, actually. So that was quite a while back. I'm 22 now. So that was 11 years ago.

Fellippe:

What was the first language you got in touch with?

Loudar:

That was actually QB64 because my stepdad gave me a book where QB64 was featured. And I went on to download that then just used it ever since. I don't remember the name of the book though. I was in, like, fifth grade or something. And, you know, as every fifth grader with a computer, I wanted to become a hacker. And I asked my stepdad, so he gave me this book and, then it was like, oh yeah, I'm going to try this language. It wasn't the only language in the book. There also was Visual Basic and I think C, but I never went there and I just stopped at QB64 and been happy ever since.

Fellippe:

In attempting to become a hacker, how far did you get?

Loudar:

I wouldn't call myself a hacker now. I mean a hacker isn't really a hacker like you see from movies, or something. It's more like you randomly find stuff and explore it, and then maybe make a bug report or something. That's sort of hacking nowadays.

Fellippe:

What were the first things you started writing in QB64?

Loudar:

Besides the things mentioned in the book, like a hello world program and some simple input and output stuff, I think I made a cookie clicker once in school. That was horrible. I tried to make an operating system in a window, of course.

Fellippe:

And what did that lead you into? Do you work with programming nowadays?

Loudar:

Yes, I do. I still code really frequently, many different things. It's not only QB64. It's also websites, for like over a year now and stuff. I've also started looking into C a tiny little bit, but haven't really ventured deep there. So yeah, QB64 is still the main thing.

Fellippe:

And you mentioned you're doing web development. What languages do you use for that?

Loudar:

Really only plain JavaScript and PHP. And I mean, HTML and CSS, of course too, but I don't know if you want to call these languages.

Fellippe:

You don't only do that in programming because we have some awesome projects coming from you. Would you like to talk a little bit about those?

Loudar:

Uh Yeah, of course. The main focus on the hobby side of things has been an image editor. Which you know, it has come a long way since like a year ago when I started it where it basically it didn't have any features besides moving images and being really laggy. And nowadays it has a couple of image processing features and stuff like that, and you can read say from multiple formats and stuff and it's yeah, I would say it's come a long way and there's still lots to do with it. And yeah, for college, I've been writing a program that works with aerial photos of facilities and detects roof areas and removes things like windows, et cetera, from it to find the area you can use for solar power or green roofs. A pretty interesting topic...

Fellippe:

Indeed.

Loudar:

...it's a big, it's a mix of like edge detection and experimental methods in terms of how to find those areas and how it cleans the output. Both projects are a lot of work, although the image editor definitely has more things to be done for it. So, yeah, that's sort of the current two products.

Fellippe:

So the image editor, I know it's it's in QB64, we have been following development. What are you using for the college project?

Loudar:

I'm also using QB64 there. Yeah, because it was the easiest. I knew how to, how to like work with images and stuff. And I used the the sort of same methods. I use the image editor for image processing that I use in the college program.

Fellippe:

That's amazing. And I didn't really know that, In this current day and age, we talked about that in an episode or two ago where we were answering the question "what's the target audience for QB64?", and you, well, you are a point outside the curve, like many of us in this community who insist on the basic language, when there are specialized tools out there, et cetera. So you learned QB64, but you know about all the other possibilities. Why still QB64 then?

Loudar:

For me it is a couple of points, really. So the first point is that the syntax is super simple and I don't know, it was like super easy to learn and it still is when I like discover a new command or something. It's so easy to remember how to use it. That like the learning curve is just insane. You don't get that in any other language, basically. And you know, I've been using it for 11 years, so there's this certain aspect of comfort in there and which I don't really have with any other language. Yeah. So I guess those are the two main points.

Fellippe:

So you have been using it for a long time, but you didn't join the community initially. How did that come about?

Loudar:

I think I joined the community when I was like starting to face some problems I couldn't really find how to solve myself. So I found the QB64 community online and then just sort of joined that.

Fellippe:

Loudar, some people say that people who have been exposed to BASIC as a first language are broken for life. Where do you stand on that?

Loudar:

I don't know. I mean that's hard to say really because BASIC offers so many possibilities that it's easy to get lost in it almost. And like me end up doing it for 11 years. I never really ventured out to any of the language. So if anyone is listening, that has sort of only used BASIC or QB64 so far, please venture out into other areas, of course. I mean, QB64 is great, but other languages do have their advantages here and there, of course. So yeah. I'm glad I, I started venturing out into other areas, especially with web development, it's super fun and you can do lots of stuff with it. But yeah, QB64 is still great for some things.

Fellippe:

Thank you so much for being with us, Loudar. It was a pleasure to have you around.

Loudar:

Of course, it was a pleasure to be here.

Fellippe:

This was QB64 report. Thank you for listening. Get QB64 from qb64.org, and find us at discord.qb64.org. Catch you next time.