QB64 Report

Interview with Ashish, from India

November 15, 2021 Fellippe Heitor Season 3 Episode 2
QB64 Report
Interview with Ashish, from India
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, we begin a series of short interviews with some of the members of the QB64 community. You've seen their names on the forum, you've run their projects, but it's time to get a bit closer. In today's episode,let's hear from Ashish, from India.

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🐝 QB64 is a modern BASIC + OpenGL language that retains QuickBASIC 4.5/QBasic compatibility. Compile natively for Windows, Linux and macOS.
• Get it from https://www.qb64.org.
• Find us also at http://discord.qb64.org.

Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/qb64)
Fellippe:

Welcome to another episode of QB64 report. I'm your host Fellippe Heitor. Today, we begin a series of short interviews with some of the members of the QB64 community. You've seen their names on the forum. You've run their projects, but it's time to get a bit closer. In today's episode, let's hear from Ashish, from India. Let's get to it. Hello, Ashish.

Ashish:

Hello. How are you?

Fellippe:

I'm very well, thank you for asking. So, Ashish, my intention with these short interviews is to get everyone else to know everyone else. And we have been a community around QB64 for so long. And sometimes we see names on the screen, but we don't know a lot about them. I'm very happy to have you here as my first guest. And I'm going to start with a very simple question: of course we are not going to be talking about very long ago because you are so young. So my question is: when did you start programming?

Ashish:

So back in 2014, when I was in sixth standard, there was a chapter named "Introduction to QBasic". So that's how I was introduced to programming. There were many crazy ideas which were spinning around in my head, when I saw the codes, QBasic code inside my book, and I came to know what does it do? What does it mean to code? So it was amazing experience There was an inner feeling of me that I can do something in this field, in this skill. So, that's how I was introduced towards programming.

Fellippe:

So it was in regular school, right? You didn't go to a specific school to start programming. All your friends got the hype with you?

Ashish:

No, not all of them. I think I was the only one who was much more excited at that time.

Fellippe:

How old were you back then?

Ashish:

12 year old.

Fellippe:

Well, so that was your first contact with programming, and you already started with QBasic.

Ashish:

Yes.

Fellippe:

And at the time had you heard of other programming languages before, or it was the first time both hearing about programming and hearing about QBasic at the same time.

Ashish:

No, I hadn't heard about any programming language. So this was my first experience with programming. And you can say that my first programming language was QBasic indeed.

Fellippe:

And what were the first things you tried to do when you were starting to learn it?

Ashish:

There were some exercises at the end of the chapter, like take two numbers, add them" and like "take a number and print its multiples up to 10". So these were the small programs which I tried to code myself.

Fellippe:

But I remember when you first popped up in the community, when you created an account at our forum, you were so young and your first project, I think, was a GUI. You introduced yourself and said, "Hey, this is a GUI, I'm creating a library". How did that come about?

Ashish:

I think my first post was that menu bar program. You remember it?

Fellippe:

I remember it. And after that, you came with a full dialogue with working controls and then people were like, where's this man coming from? And we figured out in the end, you were a 12 year old kid.

Ashish:

Actually, there was a lot of resources in QBasic. When I finished my chapter, I started looking on the internet. Like there was hundreds of articles out there. I found there was a website named petesqbsite.com. Have you heard of it? So I read so many articles in it and before joining the forum, I was regularly checking it. Had checked many other users' programs, there were many other guys like unseen unseen guy, and there are many others Unseen Machine, yes. So there are many people who are posting many different kinds of programs to the forum. What I did instead, I just copied the code from the post and pasted it into QB64's IDE, and then I try to modify it by myself, randomly, any changes on any line and just, I wanted to see what difference does it make. And that's how I was learning QB64 slowly and after learning a good amount of it, I thought I should try to make something UI, so that's how it went.

Fellippe:

Yeah, I think that tweaking existing code is really the best way to learn. And the fact that you also started that way is really, I think, inspiring for new people looking to learn QB64, right? Finding existing code, changing to see how it works... Eventually you got your feet wet on OpenGL. How was the transition?

Ashish:

You have noticed that I was not active on the forum for some time. I was actually learning web development. I was kind of doing web development after spending a little time with QB64. When I came back to QB64, I saw that there is a little thing called OpenGL, and I have not seen any people doing anything in it. So let me do some research in it. Is it difficult to learn? And when I started finding some tutorial in it, I think that it was not much difficult to render 3D stuff. I'm not saying that no one is doing any 3D program in QB64. There is STxAxTIC, who is regularly posting 3D programs and there are other many people. But in those programs, there's complex math, there's algebra, there's vectors, which is much more complicated. And I found that OpenGL is much easier. It does not have any maths. You just need to pass coordinates, and it will just render all the stuffs for you. So. By reading a lot of articles and other old tutorials, I just learned OpenGL, and I started making a lot of 3d programs and I started posting them and...

Fellippe:

...and blowing our minds because first you came with the GUI stuff, and then the amazing games you wrote, and then suddenly you were already a step ahead with OpenGL. So you moved on from QB64 to QB64 plus OpenGL, but have you also tried different languages? What other programming languages have you been in touch with?

Ashish:

Besides QB64, I also do C++. I'm also doing Python. In future, I might start to learn data science, machine learning and AI. So I'm learning Python and improving my skills in it. And I will soon learn data structures and algorithm in it, a way to improve my programming skills. I have also worked with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and other backend stuffs.

Fellippe:

And you wrote the bot that we use in our Discord server that allows us to query the Wiki. What language did you use to write that?

Ashish:

The bot is written in Python.

Fellippe:

And lots of people have been using it on our Discord server. Thank you for that. Not only that, but I also thank you Ashish for your contributions to our social media work, because you also help me with Twitter and keeping in touch with people who mention us. Thank you so much for that. Have you been working on any projects recently? And are there any other projects that you'd like to point out as important for you?

Ashish:

Yeah, in QB64 I'm currently working on an OpenGL engine. It's a library which'll allow you to render text, shapes and other stuffs, but using hardware accelerated graphics. It all will be GPU-powered. So the main goal is to achieve speed and performance, because QB64 already has a command to draw images and shapes. My goal is to achieve performance and fast rendering. And other than QB64, for now I'm exploring a lot of new things like machine learning, I'm checking GitHub actions, how does it work and playing with Linux commands and many new things.

Fellippe:

Some people say that people who have been exposed to the BASIC language are broken for life and they won't be able to program in anything else.

Ashish:

I strongly disagree on this statement. You can see me. I'm example.

Fellippe:

Yes, you are. Ashish, thank you so much. Any final words for our listenters?

Ashish:

Thank you. And the thing is I think QB64 is a very powerful tool. It has amazing support, whether it's network, sound, images, graphics. It has all in one built in. You don't need any extra modules, like in Python. Just need to use keywords. If there are issues, there's the wiki available with lots of examples. There is an active forum there's even Discord server. So I think it's a very good language for big nerds and starters.

Fellippe:

Awesome. Thank you so much, Ashish, it was a pleasure to have you with us.

Ashish:

Thank you.

Fellippe:

This was QB64 Report. Thank you for listening. See you in episode three.